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Product Information
Varoujan Markarian Armenian Chant
 
Artist: Varoujan Markarian
Item number: AK015
Category: Other Eastern
Chant Type: Armenian
Language: Armenian
Label: Holyland Records
Period: Medieval
Length: 60'58
Release date: 1995
Read a description or review of this item.

Price: $14.99 USD
This product usually ships on the next business day.
 

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Track Listing
You may need RealPlayer or Windows Media Player to listen to the music samples below.
  1. Rejoice, O Holy One MP3  
  2. We fall before You MP3  
  3. Of great and marvelous Mystery MP3  
  4. Thou Word of God MP3  
  5. We magnify the Holy Mother MP3  
  6. We beseech Thee, O Son MP3  
  7. Glorious God MP3  
  8. Light of light MP3  
  9. Today is the feast MP3  
  10. Today is the feast MP3  
  11. Multitudes of angels MP3  
Description    
Varoujan Markarian was born in Armenia in 1962. In 1986, he graduated from the Music-Pedagogical Department of the Abovian Pedagogical Institute, and in 1993 studied under the guidance of Marianna Haroutiounian of the Vocal Department of the Komitas Conservatory in Yerevan. He also has completed courses in conducting and violin. Markarian places special emphasis on Armenian liturgical music, having performed on European tours with choirs, as both a soloist and a conductor. This CD is part of a series of releases from Holyland Records featuring special masses, litanies, community prayers and hymns performed live by monks and nuns from churches and monasteries throughout the Holy Land in celebration of the Christian Jubilee in 2000.
ReviewBy: Fr. Apostolos Hill
Mr. Markarian brings the solemn beauty of Armenian chant to vibrant life in this splendid recording! His virtuosity is readily apparent from the first lilting refrain to the last. His timbre, range, and dynamics give the texts (from the 5th and 12th century -- sung in Armenian) a rich depth and texture, especially so since the entire recording is single-voice. This is a very relaxing recording made none the less so by the unknown tongue (unless the listener happens to understand Armenian) and is a worthy excursion into a different vein of liturgical chant. The music is not unlike Byzantine chant but with softer edges in places and with sometimes more predictable movements.

   
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